Love for vinyl brings hundreds to record show at Frederick Fairgrounds – Frederick News Post

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People shop for records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturdays. There were local record stores and collectors selling their vinyls. 
Rena Kapulka and her boyfriend, CJ Hostetter, peruse records at the Frederick Record Riot Saturday.
Hundreds gathered for the Frederick Record Riot at the Frederick Fairgrounds Saturday to hunt for music by artists they love.
Jacob Hyatt helps his daughter Olivia look for her first records at the Frederick Record Riot Saturday.
Justin Wages got a record player for Christmas and was on the hunt for new records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturday.

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People shop for records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturdays. There were local record stores and collectors selling their vinyls. 
People shop for records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturdays. There were local record stores and collectors selling their vinyls. 
People shop for records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturdays. There were local record stores and collectors selling their vinyls. 
Rena Kapulka and her boyfriend, CJ Hostetter, peruse records at the Frederick Record Riot Saturday.
Hundreds gathered for the Frederick Record Riot at the Frederick Fairgrounds Saturday to hunt for music by artists they love.
Jacob Hyatt helps his daughter Olivia look for her first records at the Frederick Record Riot Saturday.
Justin Wages got a record player for Christmas and was on the hunt for new records at the Frederick Record Riot on Saturday.
As “Enter Sandman” by Metallica began swelling in a building at the Frederick Fairgrounds on Saturday, people’s hands continued to flip through the bins of records before them — but their heads began to bob in unison.
Hundreds of people of all ages had flocked to the Frederick Record Riot, a large-scale show for local record stores and vinyl aficionados to sell their wares and share their passion for music.
Steve Donald drove from Columbia to shop at the show. The 65-year-old already had about nine records to take home — though he was only halfway through his tour of the room — and he was feeling nostalgic.
He had found an album from New Riders of the Purple Sage, something he’d listened to when he was 20. Another was from Toni Childs, an artist he only has on CD.
He said he loved seeing vinyls have a resurgence.
“I have my old stereo, same turntable, the same amplifier, and it’s just fun to use it again,” Donald said.
Stephen Gritzan, owner of Iris Records in Jersey City, New Jersey, is the organizer of the Record Riot shows. He’s been doing them since 2008, and the show spans across eight states, he said.
It’s gratifying to see people from all walks of life gathering for a love for music, he said. He especially loves it when he sees younger people getting excited about vinyls.
“Everyone is excited to be around other people talking about music, sharing their passion for music, and rediscovering what life was like 30 years ago when there wasn’t so much to do,” he said.
And the turnout on Saturday was exceptional, he said. About 125 people bought tickets for the show beforehand, he said, but hundreds more were paying at the door.
Ten-year-old Olivia Hyatt got a record player for Christmas, so the show was a chance for her to start cultivating her collection. She was with her father, Jacob Hyatt. Her brother was roaming somewhere else in the building, looking for his own vinyls.
Hyatt said he was excited to see his kids getting into records. He said the physical aspect of the records helped them get more invested in the music, as opposed to getting out their phones and using a streaming service.
“It’s a whole experience, coming into something like this, having to really dig in and look for what you’re after,” he said.
Steve Kronberg was selling records in bright yellow bins on Saturday. He’s been selling at various shows for three to four years.
Kronberg likes rock, but became a jazz and soul convert once he got into records. It’s something he wouldn’t have discovered otherwise, he said. As a seller, he also hopes the growing love for vinyls isn’t just a trend.
“I’m not sure if, with the younger crowd, if it’s a fad that’s going to go away,” he said, “or if it’s here to stay.”
Taylor Harbison had come to Frederick from Hanover, Pennsylvania, to look for records from the bands X, Bad Brains, Nirvana and Scream. She loves punk rock, especially punk rock that spans from the 60s to the 90s, she said.
Harbison, 29, said she grew up listening to vinyls and CDs. Listening to music with something like Spotify can be great, she said, if you’re not trying to commit to an artist or band, but she loves how music can become tangible with a vinyl.
She enjoys reading the dust jackets and the inserts, to see how the songs were created, who the producers were and what the story was behind an album. You don’t have that with digital streaming, she said.
“You lose a lot of that physical media,” she said. “You just know it as a song.”
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My father had a collection of classical music on vinyl that numbered 1000- 1200 albums. He died before the resurgence of vinyl. We found ourselves unable to even give them to anyone or donate them to any library or other institution. We had to throw them away.
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